Digital Cameras

Wolf

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Digital cameras : Buy performance, not megapixels - Yahoo! Shopping

Better displays
LCD displays on basic cameras continue to improve, which is why you'll find that most recommended models have at least a 3-inch display with good or very good quality. That's important, because none of the subcompacts or compacts has an optical or electronic viewfinder. You don't have to pay a lot for a very good LCD. The Canon PowerShot SD4000 IS ELPH, $220, has one, though the display on the Leica V-Lux 20, $650, is just OK. If you must have a viewfinder in a basic camera, look for one of the three superzooms that include electronic viewfinders: the Nikon Coolpix P100, Canon PowerShot SX30 IS, or the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ40.

Trickle-up attractions
Useful features usually trickle down from advanced cameras to basic ones, but some are actually moving in the opposite direction. For example, the swiveling LCD has moved up to the advanced Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3K and Nikon D5100. That feature, which originated on basic cameras, can be useful for self-portraits, hard-to-reach shots, or photographing children. The same advanced Panasonic Lumix includes a touch screen that lets you control exposure settings on the screen. You can also tap its LCD to set a focus point or snap a photo.

Greater zoom on small cameras
Manufacturers are putting impressive zoom lenses on subcompacts without adding much weight or bulk. The Nikon Coolpix S8000 has a 10x zoom and weighs only 6 ounces.

Powerful zooms on bigger models
Camera makers are putting very powerful zoom lenses on the larger, bulkier models we call superzooms. The Canon PowerShot SX30 IS has one of the widest zoom ranges we've seen, 35x, which is the 35-mm equivalent of 24 to 840 mm. To get that kind of shooting versatility with an SLR or SLR-like camera, you'd have to buy two or more interchangeable lenses. In the past, superzooms sacrificed image quality for versatility. But that's no longer the case. All the superzooms in the Select Ratings (available to subscribers) have very good image quality, though not quite comparable to an SLR's.

New lens designs
Most models that accept interchangeable lenses still come with the usual 18- to 55-mm zoom. But camera and lens makers do offer more versatile zooms. For instance, Panasonic recently introduced a 45- to 175-mm f/4.0-5.6 telephoto zoom (the 35-mm equivalent of 90 to 350 mm), which has a power-zoom switch on the lens barrel that you can use to zoom smoothly.

Cameras with 3D
As more electronics manufacturers add a 3D feature to HDTVs, you might expect to find it on many cameras. But 3D is making only modest inroads, mostly in basic cameras. Olympus, Sony and Panasonic have been the most aggressive in adding it to their models. In our Ratings (available to subscribers), just two basic models, Olympus SP-610UZ and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX9V, and two advanced ones, Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF2K and Lumix DMC-G3K, include 3D. The two advanced models require a special lens for 3D that costs $200.

If you have a 3D-capable TV and would like to try out the budding technology without spending a bundle, consider a basic model first to see if you like it.

Mirrorless advanced cameras
A big development in cameras this year has been the rise of the SLR-like model, a smaller, lighter competitor that also uses interchangeable lenses.

Sony recently introduced six such models, and Nikon finally joined most other major SLR makers by unveiling two 10-megapixel SLR-like cameras: the Nikon V1 ($900 with kit lens) and Nikon J1 ($650 with kit lens). We haven't tested them yet.

Most of the new SLR-like cameras are more compact than SLRs and include sensors larger than those of basic cameras. As we went to press, Canon didn't offer this type of camera.
 

Wolf

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Reason why I posted this, I been looking for a new digital camera for a while. Probably a Canon camera, because I'm somewhat familiar with them and they are good brands. So I'm possible looking possible for a 30x + zoom, 10x + megapixel. So what do you guys own and recommended?
 

jef

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For zooms that big, you don't get a lot of choices from each manufacturer. From Canon, it's I think just the SX30 and SX40. I'm a big fan of Canon's Point and Shoots, and have an S95 currently. I just picked up and sx120 for my Mom, and it seems like a pretty capable camera too.

In the past, I've had a Sony large zoom camera (DSC-H5B when 12x zoom was still a big deal) and really liked it. I'm currently eyeballing a Sony P&S with a longer zoom than what my S95 has, to fill in for when I don't feel like carrying the DSLR, yet might need a longer zoom. The issue with the zoom you are looking for at the moment is that the cameras can get pretty bulky - so consider how often you will need a 30x or greater zoom and weigh that against the negative of not being able to put the camera in your pocket.
 
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Wolf

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Yea 30x zoom is probably to much, I just saw a theme of that on some cameras. But I been looking at the Canon Rebel cameras or other similar like them. Not these thin cameras like the size of a phone. I'm not a major photographer, but I can some good shots and I have watched and learn some tricks from my dad.
 
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Casual Fan

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Wolf, I would not buy a DSLR (like a Rebel) right out of the gate...yes, they have "automatic" modes, but you really need to learn how to shoot manually and have a couple different lenses to get the most out of them. You're looking at $1,000-$1,500. And they're fragile and finicky.

If I were looking to get into photography and wanted something that would give me some creative control (read: manual shooting) but also serve as a point-and-shoot for parties, baseball games, etc., I'd go with the new Canon SX30:

Canon U.S.A. : Consumer & Home Office : PowerShot SX30 IS

It's got great looks (looks like a mini-DSLR), has an insane zoom, is fast (has Canon's latest processor), plenty of pixels (14), and lot of features (HD video and a swivel LCD). And it's only about $360 from Amazon.

I'd have bought one, but I got my wife a Panasonic Lumix for her birthday (a great "slim" point and shoot) so I can't justify another camera.

Just as an FYI, I own a Rebel XSI and would recommend the Rebel line when you want to move up and have a little cash to spend on an extra lens or two, a tripod, some filters, external flash, etc.
 

jef

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The Rebels are a good starter DSLR. I'm a Sony Alpha shooter - I like that any image stabilization is done in the camera, not the lens - but if I was to choose a different system, I'd probably go Canon.

Lots of people like Nikon, too, so don't leave them out if you are evaluating options. Because once you start picking up lenses, it gets harder to make the jump to a different maker. Well, maybe not harder, but certainly more expensive :)
 

Casual Fan

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Jef is correct. And the Sony line is very good, not on par with Canon or Nikon on the pro end yet (read: $2,500+), but like most things Sony they're very good. Mostly it's Canon and Nikon's extensive lens offerings that set them apart. Canon and Nikon are the "top dogs" on the pro end (plus some very expensive players like Leica and Hasselblad) but at the hobbyist level and down there are about six or eight manufacturers that are putting out great stuff (Panasonic, Sony, Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Olympus...).
 

Bandwagon03

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My wife is in the market for a Point and Shoot, we had a older model Nikon Coolpix, but, I was not impressed with it, especially the shutter speed, etc.

I had a Olympus Stylus back in the day, that I just adored, might look for a Olympus for her.

While I think Sony makes good stuff, their propitiatory crap really grates on my nerves, you cant buy a generic charger, or a usb cable for Sony, it's like they wont to be Apple or something..
 

Wolf

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I'm not much into Sony cameras and I have been nailing it down to either Canon or Nikon, but DSLR don't bother me, I been taking photos for many years now and I use some of my dad's old cameras with the film strip you have to add into it. But I want a digital camera and I'm willing to pay several hundred dollars for a Rebel. I doubt, I will be changing lenses on the camera. Just need one with good megapixel, zoom, along with some other cool bell and whistles.
 

HecticArt

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What. Jeff said about the Canon SX30 is pretty much what you're looking for.
You won't have to worry about changing lenses. It does the fully automatic thing so you don't have to worry about missing a shot if you're in a rush. It will also let you go fully manual and tinker with all of the settings yourself. Good, solid, & dependable. Lots of features packed into a single easy to use package. Reasonably affordable too under $400. Really good to learn with, without investing thousands of bucks.
 

Wolf

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After watching the video presentation of the Canon PowerShot SX30 IS it does has everything what I am looking for and plus, you guys are right. I don't have to change lenses, which could be a bit annoying.

I did saw the Canon PowerShot SX40 HS, which both have the same specs, but the SX40 has a several extra features.

But the only major difference I see between these two are:

SX30 - 14.1 megapixels, 720p HD
SX40 - 12.1 megapixels, 1080 Full HD

The 720 vs 1080 HD, I could careless it almost pretty much the same. But the SX30 does have 2 extra megapixels. So I'll probably go with the SX30? Thanks thanks for your guys suggestion, specially yours jef!
 

HecticArt

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After watching the video presentation of the Canon PowerShot SX30 IS it does has everything what I am looking for and plus, you guys are right. I don't have to change lenses, which could be a bit annoying.

I did saw the Canon PowerShot SX40 HS, which both have the same specs, but the SX40 has a several extra features.

But the only major difference I see between these two are:

SX30 - 14.1 megapixels, 720p HD
SX40 - 12.1 megapixels, 1080 Full HD

The 720 vs 1080 HD, I could careless it almost pretty much the same. But the SX30 does have 2 extra megapixels. So I'll probably go with the SX30? Thanks thanks for your guys suggestion, specially yours jef!
Don't get hung up on the megapixels. The processor is the important thing. With 2 extra MP you can't really print much larger. Most people don't print much these days anyway. Which ever one you can get a better deal on is the way to go.
 

Wolf

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Don't get hung up on the megapixels. The processor is the important thing. With 2 extra MP you can't really print much larger. Most people don't print much these days anyway. Which ever one you can get a better deal on is the way to go.
I really don't print pictures really, unless my mom wants a specific picture. I just thought 2 extra MP would make the picture quality a bit better amd I did said, I could careless about the 720 vs 1080 HD, but now everything I use is 1080 and the picture quality is more crystal clear. Just like you said, I'll for the better deal somewhere. Since Christmas is right around the corner, this is the best time of the year with very good deals on stuff.
 

HecticArt

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I really don't print pictures really, unless my mom wants a specific picture. I just thought 2 extra MP would make the picture quality a bit better amd I did said, I could careless about the 720 vs 1080 HD, but now everything I use is 1080 and the picture quality is more crystal clear.
The 2 MP won't make a difference on your monitor. It'll just take up more hard drive space when you save the files. The processor makes the difference when the mp's are that similar. Those 2 cameras should have the same processor. Basically, the picture quality will come from how the processor blends the pixels from the sensor. The race for a higher MP camera is a little bit of an advertising gimmick.

If you aren't planning on printing larger than 8x10 prints, I'd go with the less expensive camera.
 

Wolf

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I print various sizes, but I only do that few times a year. Also I can't find the processor speeds on those cameras, but there probably similar. But I'll check them those cameras and play with them a bit either at Best Buy or Fry's Electronics. I do know Fry's has a huge banner in front of there store, we match internet prices. So I bet they can match the amazon price?
 

jef

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Off-topic, but hopefully WolfViper won't mind a thread hijack since he's mostly made up his mind...

This is also on my Xmas list:

Lytro

 

HecticArt

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It's not the processor speed, its the way that it processes the data it gets off of the sensor.
They should have the same one. Canon is using the DIGIC processors in these cameras. There isn't much of a difference between the 4 and 5. The 5 will let you shoot a couple more pictures in a single second and has a little less noise. You're not going to notice a difference between the 2. Whatever gets you a better deal or whatever they have in stock you'll be happy with.
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ProperModulation

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I got rid of my DSLR-sized Canon superzoom. Great camera but too big to take everywhere. I picked up a Canon es300is (or something like that) . Awesome point and shoot! Super small and slim and takes great pics and amazing video. Its also well integrated with my eyefi card. And best of all it retails for about 200 to 230 bucks. I agree about pixels. Its like 12mp but I always cut down to 5 or 6. You generally don't need that extra resolution and it just means bigger files.

I find myself using the camera a lot more because it can fit in my pocket, and it also takes better pics and video than my 3 year old superzoom (is10 I think) .

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
 

HecticArt

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I've got a big honking Canon 20D that has all the bells and whistles several lenses all the extra crap and its a pain in the arse. I find myself carrying around a Coolpix point & shoot a lot. The P+S's have gotten really great over the last several years. Most of the DRC photo contest winners were taken with P+S cameras.
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