XM-ready radio for home listening

Bandit 5160

Member
Oct 31, 2008
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I saw a XM radio home kit with a home dock, cartridge, mini-tuner, and antennae at Best Buy, but it says I need an XM-ready radio for this equipment to work. Can I just use a radio with an "AUX" hookup, or do I have to get a special XM-ready radio to use my home antenna and equipment and listen to XM in my bedroom? I can't find any stellite-radio ready radios anywhere! Radio Shack says if I buy a special piece of equipment from them for about $8, I can use any radio with an AUX hole. I thought Radio Shake was a Sirius-only company, though, so I'm not sure if they can help me with XM. Or can they? Should I look online for an XM-ready radio, or go to Radio Shack? Suggestions? Also, I have headr that getting a good signal and getting good reception can be potentially problematic with these home kits. Anyone here think that is true? If I can't get reception, then the kit is obviously not worth getting.
 
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ThomasM

Member
Aug 10, 2009
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70
Milwaukee, WI
"XM Ready" receivers are generally expensive home-theater type or stereo equipment that actually needs quite a bit to enable XM.

You are much better off buying a genuine XM radio and then getting either a "home kit" which consists of a docking station, power supply, and home antenna. They are about $50 and are radio-specific (it has to match the model XM receiver you have).

Additionally, there are a number of "boom boxes" available which not only include the home power supply and antenna but also an amplifier and speakers. A "boom box" and the XM receiver designed for it is all you need to listen at home while the "home kit" has output jacks and must be connected to an amplifier and speakers which are not included.
 

geosync

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2008
1,817
293
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Portland, Or
Well, the Nexus line of receivers are considered "XM Ready" and actually say that on the face of the radio. These radios employed the mini tuner, a small black cartridge that you could transfer between multiple home and car docks, taking your subscription with you also with multiple radios. Can you post a picture of the stuff you bought? And where do you live?
 

kryptonite

Well-Known Member
Oct 21, 2008
9,417
1,197
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Additionally, there are a number of "boom boxes" available which not only include the home power supply and antenna but also an amplifier and speakers. A "boom box" and the XM receiver designed for it is all you need to listen at home while the "home kit" has output jacks and must be connected to an amplifier and speakers which are not included.

Through my experience with Sirius, I'm able to hook the boombox's headphone plug up to a professional home stereo (or DJ equipment) using one of these:




I can also hook my iPod up to the aux input on the Sirius radio...don't know if XM has anything like this, but it's a neat feature.


My advice? Get a plug n play model with a boombox. It shouldn't cost more than $150-$200 for the hardware.