Why do unknown "artists" over value their art so much??

MAJ Badmotherfarker

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Oct 11, 2008
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I prefer buying original paintings/photography/crafts to decorate my apartment because I like supporting local artists over large retailers. Right now I'm looking at a few paintings. But these "artists" are often asking $2,000-3,000 (minimal) for their work. It seems insane to me.

I like original art, but if it comes down to $150 at Bed, Bath and Beyond for a cool looking replica vs. $2,000 for something painted by somebody that nobody knows, I'm sticking with the replica.

I'm all for supporting local art, but give me a break. Every painting is not priceless.
 

memebag

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It's because money=quality in the art world. The more a painting costs, the better it is. It's the same thing you see with bottled water and restaurants, only amplified. Since there are no other objective measures of art value, money rules.
 

MAJ Badmotherfarker

is drinking a beer.
Oct 11, 2008
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Washington D.C.
It's because money=quality in the art world. The more a painting costs, the better it is. It's the same thing you see with bottled water and restaurants, only amplified. Since there are no other objective measures of art value, money rules.

That's actually a great point. A lot of people look at a menu and pick the most expensive wine because they think it's the "best". When, if fact, you can get just as good, generally, for under $20.
I'm liking this guy- nice stuff and he seems to know that it's just shit that hangs on a wall, not gold:

splashyart > Robert R FAST SHIP! Splashy Art Bronze chocolate latte abstract original 5 paintings by Robert R - all 5 panels & fast shipping for
 

memebag

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That's actually a great point. A lot of people look at a menu and pick the most expensive wine because they think it's the "best". When, if fact, you can get just as good, generally, for under $20.
I'm liking this guy- nice stuff and he seems to know that it's just shit that hangs on a wall, not gold:

Funny you should mention gold. It works much the same way as art. People think it has a certain value, so it does. It's a useful metal, but that usefulness doesn't account for the comparative stability people assign to it versus fiat currency.


Sweet. I hope he makes a fortune.

My favorite working artist (Jeff Koons) makes a mockery of the whole art market and laughs all the way to the bank. This sold two years ago for $23.6 million:



It's just a heart made of stainless steel. He doesn't even make them himself. He has art students and crafts folks for that. He thinks it up and signs his name. Ka-ching!
 

HecticArt

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It's also a little bit like plumbers.

Plumbers charge a hundred bucks just to show up at your house then a hundred an hour. But they only make a couple of house calls per day. They aren't actually plumbing for 40 hours a week, so they have to charge more to make a living.

An artist that doesn't sell a lot of work, has to try to put a bigger sticker on his work to make a buck too. Then you look at the gallery commission, framing, materials, and time, it starts to add up too.

I've had some photography at a couple of galleries, and the gallery can charge 40-50% commission easily. For a small piece, $30 bucks for the print from a good photo lab, $60 for for a simple gallery frame, you'd like to make at least a hundred for the effort, so all the sudden you're looking at a $400 sticker on a piece thats done by an admitted amateur. I have a day job, so I'm not trying to pay the bills with it. I'd only like to make a few bucks to buy new equipment.
 

HecticArt

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Oct 19, 2008
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Funny you should mention gold. It works much the same way as art. People think it has a certain value, so it does. It's a useful metal, but that usefulness doesn't account for the comparative stability people assign to it versus fiat currency.



Sweet. I hope he makes a fortune.

My favorite working artist (Jeff Koons) makes a mockery of the whole art market and laughs all the way to the bank. This sold two years ago for $23.6 million:



It's just a heart made of stainless steel. He doesn't even make them himself. He has art students and crafts folks for that. He thinks it up and signs his name. Ka-ching!

Chihuly does the same thing with his glass.
He has apprentices do the work for him now, while he wanders around and gives them instructions. He's making bank for sure.
 

blyons200

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Oct 12, 2008
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It's also a little bit like plumbers.

Plumbers charge a hundred bucks just to show up at your house then a hundred an hour. But they only make a couple of house calls per day. They aren't actually plumbing for 40 hours a week, so they have to charge more to make a living.

An artist that doesn't sell a lot of work, has to try to put a bigger sticker on his work to make a buck too. Then you look at the gallery commission, framing, materials, and time, it starts to add up too.

I've had some photography at a couple of galleries, and the gallery can charge 40-50% commission easily. For a small piece, $30 bucks for the print from a good photo lab, $60 for for a simple gallery frame, you'd like to make at least a hundred for the effort, so all the sudden you're looking at a $400 sticker on a piece thats done by an admitted amateur. I have a day job, so I'm not trying to pay the bills with it. I'd only like to make a few bucks to buy new equipment.

Actually I thought plumbers charged so much because of the "disgusting" factor. My brother is a plumber, but he only does new systems and industrial repair like hot water heaters for hotels. He doesn't make 100 bucks and hour though, he usually works 40 hours a week. (not self-employed though)
 

memebag

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I thought I would share this with the group, one of my favorite Jeff Koons' pieces:


It's always been extremely valuable, but I imagine that value has just gone up. Art is so happy!
 

robhurlburt

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Oct 15, 2008
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I went a local art fair/gallery hop, and a $2K painting was a cheap one. People throw a bunch of colors on a canvas (not even drawing anything), and they were charging $6k+. I guess i don't understand art enough to pay for it. I'm a BBB/TJ Maxx art shopper. Nothing else is worth it IMO.

UNLESS, its an orginal Escher or Dali, but then again I could never afford it