Rumor that some cars may Dump AM/FM

Jon

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Dec 16, 2008
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You're starting to piss me off. Show me something that you can get a high speed internet connection from a satellite while driving or admit your wrong.

You CAN get a high speed internet connection, while driving, using UConnect in a Chrysler vehicle. It's already been proven.
 

blyons200

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Oct 12, 2008
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You CAN get a high speed internet connection, while driving, using UConnect in a Chrysler vehicle. It's already been proven.

Your wrong, I'm done with this thread.

Grown ups don't believe in things that don't exist and can admit when they are wrong. You're like a child, even when faced with all the facts you keep saying nuh uh.
 
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Jon

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Your wrong, I'm done with this thread.

Grown ups don't believe in things that don't exist and can admit when they are wrong. You're like a child, even when faced with all the facts you keep saying nuh uh.

You've already been reported for trolling and rude posts in one thread, would you like to make it two? I've already proven my case. You can't see it. That's your problem, not mine.
 

drdroo

#1 by Women 18-24
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There are satellite Internet products for vehicles, but they're kinda big. For instance, the Raysat Stealthray 5000 is 45x35x7.5 inches. Basically they're made to go on the roof rack of a SUV. They're also 80 pounds. Oh, and VSAT service is really expensive.

The truth is, since 4G came out, the cell carriers have determined there isn't money to be had in minutes or even texts anymore. The future in billing customers for cell use is in data. For this reason, many of us had Unlimited data previously and subsequently lost it during an equipment upgrade. Many of us lost our 5GB plans in favor of 2GB for the same money.

I've built Broadband wireless infrastructure in the past. It takes a lot of work to deliver streaming media, especially in real-time, to a dozen cell customers in the same cell at the same time. The cell carriers dislike these customers and aren't going to build for them. If it works, great, if not, oh well.

There are some tricks to be had, like LTE Broadcast (Multicast) and the like. Unless a cell carrier is suddenly going to become a strong content provider, I don't see this being a heavily invested thing in the immediate future.

The reason why I think ditching AM/FM radio is not terribly likely is because it's really trivial and cheap to implement. If you were going to ditch anything, you'd ditch the WiFi Hotspot technology that most people wouldn't subscribe to because it is expensive to use. Instead, you'd have a connection to a customer cell phone, which is cheaper and they're likely to at least use it for advanced telematics.
 

blyons200

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There are satellite Internet products for vehicles, but they're kinda big. For instance, the Raysat Stealthray 5000 is 45x35x7.5 inches. Basically they're made to go on the roof rack of a SUV. They're also 80 pounds. Oh, and VSAT service is really expensive.

So it does exist! I can't imagine that will be built into consumer OEM products, ever. But it's nice to know muti-millioniares can stream radio over the internet in their military style hunting vehicle. Call me when Dodge implements this in their cars and trucks.
 

drdroo

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Yes but you can't use that while the vehicle is moving, you have to stop to use it. Defeating the purpose of streaming radio over the internet from a satellite while driving.

Not entirely true, some do track along with movement of the vehicle, much like the ones being installed as we speak on aircraft. The Stealthray 5000 VSAT antenna I mentioned does support tracking too, up to 350km/h of speed.

StealthRay 5000 - mobile broadband connectivity, SatCom on the move, mobile VSAT and mobile satellite internet
 

blyons200

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Not entirely true, some do track along with movement of the vehicle, much like the ones being installed as we speak on aircraft. The Stealthray 5000 VSAT antenna I mentioned does support tracking too, up to 350km/h of speed.

StealthRay 5000 - mobile broadband connectivity, SatCom on the move, mobile VSAT and mobile satellite internet

Ya I double checked and edited my previous post. I still have serious doubts something like this will be implemented in a consumer OEM device in the next 30 years. That's exteremely expensive stuff, not really a consumer item. If people want to wirelessly stream the from the internet while driving on the Kansas prairey still have long wait.
 

drdroo

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Ya I double checked and edited my previous post. I still have serious doubts something like this will be implemented in a consumer OEM device in the next 30 years. That's exteremely expensive stuff, not really a consumer item. If people want to wirelessly stream the from the internet while driving on the Kansas prairey still have long wait.

I wasn't disputing that, just saying it exists, we're actually on the same page with this. The antenna itself is 2-3 grand, plus the terminal (probably another 500 or so) and then the service. Great for the oil/gas industry or stormchasers, not so great for the regular Joe. A company made a similar receive-only antenna (just as big and hideous) for TV reception at one point in time and basically no-one bought it.

As it sits, satellite radio (and satellite technology in general) is great at what it does, namely broadcasting one thing to many people. To use the Internet as a broadcast medium is done, but not done as well as a satellite.

When you flip it, Satellites are awful for two-way applications and are often called a 'misuse of a satellite' when used for Internet. There are better ways to do two-way applications and satellites are a last ditch effort.
 

blyons200

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I've been building out cellular networks for years now. I think that is the future of true mobile data, but we have a long,longway to go.
 

semipenguin

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Oct 11, 2008
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You're starting to piss me off. Show me something that you can get a high speed internet connection from a satellite while driving or admit your wrong.

Kick some ass, Seabass! :eek:mfg:

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S III using Tapatalk :)
 

semipenguin

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You've already been reported for trolling and rude posts in one thread, would you like to make it two? I've already proven my case. You can't see it. That's your problem, not mine.

He's not trolling, but you're whining.

Chill out, yo! :mad:

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S III using Tapatalk :)
 

blyons200

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I've been building out cellular networks for years now. I think that is the future of true mobile data, but we have a long,longway to go.
 

drdroo

#1 by Women 18-24
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I've been building out cellular networks for years now. I think that is the future of true mobile data, but we have a long,longway to go.

Compared to satellite? likely true. However, I don't think this connected car phenomenon that people are trying to construct is likely to generate interest for the customer as it sits today. The customer may go 'Oooh, Pandora' on their Entune system, until they either reach their first overage, or actually research what it costs. 15-20$ a GB isn't going to get it done.

I've yet to see someone make a good easy platform where you can put stuff in your computer, your car connects by WiFi to your home network, and everything is synched before you leave. I think such a thing would be more lucrative for the customer than putting a cell phone or the Internet in the middle.
 

HecticArt

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Oct 19, 2008
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Keep it civil people. Agree, disagree politely, or move on.


So if I may sum this all up.......
Satellite internet IS available, expensive, bulky, and not likely to be a an OEM option in the near future.

FM, not likely to go away soon, even if we aren't fans of it.
 

drdroo

#1 by Women 18-24
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Oct 9, 2008
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Can we vote to drop HD Radio from cars? I can't imagine that they aren't paying licensing to put a basically useless feature in there.. :) (Hey it is still AM/FM sorta).