In case you've ever wondered what a military biochemist does...

MAJ Badmotherfarker

is drinking a beer.
Oct 11, 2008
8,461
211
63
Washington D.C.
Here's what I've been writing up this week. This is how exciting life is as a biochemist.... :no::


Section A. Specific Aims


The most likely scenarios resulting in mass casualties from a radiological event involve either detonation of a nuclear weapon or the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD), or “dirty bombâ€. In either case, casualties are expected to suffer from a combination of injuries, consisting of radiation exposure in addition to burns, bleeding, blunt force trauma and infection. Because the prognosis for all combined injuries (CI) is worse than for radiation injury (RI) alone, strategies for reducing the synergistic effects of CI must be sought. Unfortunately, the mechanism(s) underlying sensitization to radiation by additional trauma are poorly understood and, as a result, there are currently no medical countermeasures for CI. Our long term goal is to develop a successful regimen to mitigate or reverse the physiological consequences of CI.

CI casualties suffer from numerous and extensive physical impairments, including reduced hematopoiesis, susceptibility to bacterial infection, delayed wound healing and multiple organ failure. These conditions originate at the cellular level, with CI challenged cells exhibiting dramatic changes in their gene expression profiles, including increases in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cytokines, extracellular matrix proteins, toll-like receptor signaling and Wnt-mediated JUNK signaling, along with a concurrent decrease in cell-cell adhesion proteins. Some genes that are modulated in response to CI are also affected by RI alone. For instance, upregulation of iNOS has been linked to radiation-induced, cell apoptosis. In the case of RI, inhibition of iNOS, COX-2, or cytokine production, or treatment with antibiotics prior to exposure have been shown to confer radioprotection. However, these manipulations do not treat or mitigate the detrimental effects of CI.
Because morbidity arising from CI is due mainly to cell death, the primary goal during post-exposure stabilization is to replace or repair damaged tissue as quickly as possible. It is evident that an i.v. injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) ameliorates RI in mice. We hypothesize the BMSCs may provide a therapeutic modality whereby damaged tissues can be directly repaired or regenerated.
 

Oren

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2008
1,863
34
48
55
NE NJ
I'm a computer programmer. We're technical. You MUST come to NYC to get your freak on.

C'mon! Relieve yourself. :p


:help:
 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
40,010
11,647
168
Toledo, Ohio
I haven't wondered myself, I'm much more curious at how many beers you consume per year.

This picture of him as a baby from his family photo album may shed a little light on that.

 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
40,010
11,647
168
Toledo, Ohio
LOL.
By 3 you should have been able to open the fridge by yourself!

I grew up drinking the Rock. It's what dad bought. I'll still get one every now and then. It reminds me of sharing a cold one with the old man when I was 8 doing yard work on a summer afternoon.

Cant buy those memories.
 

MAJ Badmotherfarker

is drinking a beer.
Oct 11, 2008
8,461
211
63
Washington D.C.
LOL.
By 3 you should have been able to open the fridge by yourself!

I grew up drinking the Rock. It's what dad bought. I'll still get one every now and then. It reminds me of sharing a cold one with the old man when I was 8 doing yard work on a summer afternoon.

Cant buy those memories.


The skunk factor on today's beers is pretty high. I used to like Heineken, Rolling Rock, Moose Head and others in the green bottles but I won't buy them now. Seems like they're always stale. I either get Coors Light from the store down the street that saves the newest 12 packs for me or I take my growler across the street and have it filled with fresh brewed Heffeweizen.
 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
40,010
11,647
168
Toledo, Ohio
The skunk factor on today's beers is pretty high. I used to like Heineken, Rolling Rock, Moose Head and others in the green bottles but I won't buy them now. Seems like they're always stale. I either get Coors Light from the store down the street that saves the newest 12 packs for me or I take my growler across the street and have it filled with fresh brewed Heffeweizen.

Mmmmm heffe. . . .

Yeah, they don't ship and store very carefully now, and the skunk factor keeps me away from green glass for the most part. They started importing Carlsberg from Denmark again (It was brewed by Labatt for a while) and I had to give it a try. Green glass and all it was a pretty good beer.
 

MAJ Badmotherfarker

is drinking a beer.
Oct 11, 2008
8,461
211
63
Washington D.C.
Mmmmm heffe. . . .

Yeah, they don't ship and store very carefully now, and the skunk factor keeps me away from green glass for the most part. They started importing Carlsberg from Denmark again (It was brewed by Labatt for a while) and I had to give it a try. Green glass and all it was a pretty good beer.

It's deadly here in MD. The county runs the liquor supply so beer will sit in county warehouses for MONTHS before hitting the stores. When I first moved here, I couldn't find any beer that wasn't past the "drink by" date on the box. I tossed the first few cases I bought because they were undrinkable. Then came my savior. They brew all their own, they're right across the street and it's $10 for a 2L to go growler: