HD radio question

DLariv308

New Member
Oct 27, 2008
25
1
3
MA
I just purchased a Yamaha RX-X863 a/v receiver. I have been messing around with it for a day or so now and it has built in HD radio. It seems like I can only receive 3 channels that have HD, the other other channels that supposed to have them does not come in. Is this because the antenna I have , or HD band is not powerful enough. The main channel comes in loud and clear. I should add that i live about 45 miles from the broadcast towers. :confused:

Thanks in advance
 

limegrass69

Confused
Oct 12, 2008
6,079
245
63
New York
HD signals run at a very small fraction of the power of the main analog signal.
That's the compromise that had to be made in order to allow the analog and digital signals to co-exist on the same frequency.
The FCC and NPR are experimenting with increasing the power of digital signals. However, it seems that so far, adding too much more power to the digital signal starts to cause interference on adjacent channels. So the bottom line is that it might get a little better, but not too much.
Also, some stations are not in a big hurry to get their digital signals back on the air if there are problems. It's just not a high priority in many cases. Engineering staffs are already stretched, and the analog signals are the money makers (and thus the main priority).

Radio, like the rest of the world, needs to deal with the move to digital from analog.
HD radio, as it was executed, is a poorly executed concept. I realize that something had to be done about the millions of existing analog receivers, but maybe a new "digital only" band with a 10 year transition window would have been a better solution.
 

limegrass69

Confused
Oct 12, 2008
6,079
245
63
New York
HD signals run at a very small fraction of the power of the main analog signal.
That's the compromise that had to be made in order to allow the analog and digital signals to co-exist on the same frequency.
The FCC and NPR are experimenting with increasing the power of digital signals. However, it seems that so far, adding too much more power to the digital signal starts to cause interference on adjacent channels. So the bottom line is that it might get a little better, but not too much.
Also, some stations are not in a big hurry to get their digital signals back on the air if there are problems. It's just not a high priority in many cases. Engineering staffs are already stretched, and the analog signals are the money makers (and thus the main priority).

Radio, like the rest of the world, needs to deal with the move to digital from analog.
HD radio, as it was executed, is a poorly executed concept. I realize that something had to be done about the millions of existing analog receivers, but maybe a new "digital only" band with a 10 year transition window would have been a better solution.

If possible, try an outdoor antenna.
 

ai4i

Member
Oct 22, 2008
61
2
8
69
Area Code 954
What are you using for an antenna?
How high is it?
Is it in the clear and pointed the right way?
Good low loss shielded downlead?
These are all important considerations.
 

limegrass69

Confused
Oct 12, 2008
6,079
245
63
New York
What are you using for an antenna?
How high is it?
Is it in the clear and pointed the right way?
Good low loss shielded downlead?
These are all important considerations.

Right...which is why HD Radio is the failure that it is.
It needs to be plug and play.

It's really too bad. HD Radio had a chance to be a game changer, and they blew it. Broadcasters don't want to make the investment in hardware or programming. Listeners don't care.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

Sherbert is NOT and NEVER WILL BE ice cream.
Oct 11, 2008
19,374
6,914
168
Toronto, ON
The biggest problem with HD Radio is the stations, although crystal clear, are programmed by the same bozos who program the analogue stations which have everybody turning them off. Why invest in hardware to get low quality crap with a high quality signal?
 

limegrass69

Confused
Oct 12, 2008
6,079
245
63
New York
The biggest problem with HD Radio is the stations, although crystal clear, are programmed by the same bozos who program the analogue stations which have everybody turning them off. Why invest in hardware to get low quality crap with a high quality signal?

It's even worse than that! The programmers put next to no money into the programming. You essentially get either an automated jukebox or a national feed. There is very little innovative programming going on. Plus, there is little to no advertising on the HD streams, so there is no incentive to invest. It's a stalemate.

Poor technology
Poor hardware
Poor programming
Little to no end user interest
No advertisers
 

kc1ih

Active Member
Oct 16, 2008
220
26
28
Hudson, Florida
HD Radio seems more popular with public radio stations, where they can put NPR news and information programs on their main channel, classical music on HD-2, and BBC World Service or another public station from another city on HD-3. Another interesting use seems to be in Florida where there are a lot of ex-New Yorkers, a sports station from New York is available on HD in many of the major Florida markets.