Any good, FREE antivirus these days? AntiVir is pissing me off.

PACanesFan

Member
Oct 13, 2008
203
5
18
I used AVG for the longest time. I've switched to AVAST. AVG scored low on false alarms. AVAST uses less system resources as well.
 

blyons200

These pretzels are making me thirsty.
Oct 12, 2008
8,449
1,547
113
The BBQ Capital
If you can wait for the fall, Microsoft's new antivirus has gotten really good review from beta testers.

The actual security aspect aside, the most important part of security software is undoubtedly performance. Since MSE doesn't include many of the features of OneCare, this is an area that Microsoft has a chance to excel in. In fact, the company includes three features in MSE to keep it light: CPU throttling (the system will remain responsive to the user's tasks), idle-time scanning (scans and updates use a low-priority thread and only run when the PC is idle), as well as smart caching and active memory swapping (virus signatures not in use are not loaded into memory).

It should also be noted that MSE is very small; when MSE first leaked out yesterday, we noted that the installer sizes range from just over 3MB to just over 7MB (the folder installed takes up about 11 MB). The leanness of MSE is also evident when looking at the system requirements:

For Windows XP, a PC with a CPU with clock speed of at least 500MHz and at least 256MB of RAM
For Windows Vista and Windows 7, a PC with a CPU with clock speed of at least 1.0GHz and at least 1GB of RAM
VGA (display): 800x600 or higher
Storage: 140MB of available hard-disk space
An Internet connection is required for installation and to download the latest virus and spyware definitions.


Microsoft announces free antivirus, limited public beta - Ars Technica
 

MAJ Badmotherfarker

is drinking a beer.
Oct 11, 2008
8,461
211
63
Washington D.C.
If you can wait for the fall, Microsoft's new antivirus has gotten really good review from beta testers.

The actual security aspect aside, the most important part of security software is undoubtedly performance. Since MSE doesn't include many of the features of OneCare, this is an area that Microsoft has a chance to excel in. In fact, the company includes three features in MSE to keep it light: CPU throttling (the system will remain responsive to the user's tasks), idle-time scanning (scans and updates use a low-priority thread and only run when the PC is idle), as well as smart caching and active memory swapping (virus signatures not in use are not loaded into memory).

It should also be noted that MSE is very small; when MSE first leaked out yesterday, we noted that the installer sizes range from just over 3MB to just over 7MB (the folder installed takes up about 11 MB). The leanness of MSE is also evident when looking at the system requirements:

For Windows XP, a PC with a CPU with clock speed of at least 500MHz and at least 256MB of RAM
For Windows Vista and Windows 7, a PC with a CPU with clock speed of at least 1.0GHz and at least 1GB of RAM
VGA (display): 800x600 or higher
Storage: 140MB of available hard-disk space
An Internet connection is required for installation and to download the latest virus and spyware definitions.


Microsoft announces free antivirus, limited public beta - Ars Technica

Ironically, I'm really interested in this. I've been expecting Microsoft to finally take control of the virus situation. It target their software, they could really help out.
 

PACanesFan

Member
Oct 13, 2008
203
5
18
Sorry. Meant to say AVG scored high on false alarms above. Also, AVG bogged my system down a lot (both work and home). Avast doesn't do the same thing on my home.
 

Casual Fan

Surprisingly nice
Oct 14, 2008
19,016
3,028
163
Roanoke, VA
I use Avast and have for years.

But wait a second--you're rawdogging mexican whores and you're worried about computer viruses? :confused:
 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
43,007
13,666
168
Toledo, Ohio
You might also want to download malwarebytes from malwarebytes.com. It's free and a really good malware/spam program. The main difference between the free version and the pay version, is that you have to run it and update it manually. The pay version does it all automatically. It often catches things that virus software misses. Our IT guy did some research and said it's the best free one out there.
 

Oren

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2008
1,863
34
48
56
NE NJ
I chose Avira after I read a recent Consumer Reports testing, and I was sick of paying every year for a "subscription" (NAV, McAfee, etc) In addition to purchasing their software (usually around $30). They get you on the hook, and after you pay for their software, you have to pay every year to keep it activated.

AVIRA's nag screen/popup isn't an issue for me. The pop-up appears only ONCE every 24 hours.
 

mrpacs

Well-Known Member
Oct 11, 2008
2,993
78
48
Connecticut
Sorry to bust in on this thread but $30 per year is worth it to me for peace of mind for virus and spyware protection with NOD32. Small footprint, minimal resource hog and it finds EVERYTHING. I got sick of all the nag screens with AVG and I tried Avast and AVIRA, (too many nag's just like AVG).
 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
43,007
13,666
168
Toledo, Ohio
I paid for CA Trust for my home machine. It seems to work pretty good. A few months ago I developed an issue where my Windows firewall won't stay shut off, and it fights with the CA Trust firewall. I often have to manually turn one of the two off to get online, but I think it's Windows not the CA causing the problem. Since they gave me a laptop for work, I don't use my home machine very often, but I do like the piece of mind having good protection.

 
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